Latisys, Online Tech Open New Data Centers

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Two data center service providers announced new facilities today. Here’s an overview:

Latisys Opens New Site in Irvine: Citing growing demand for high-density colocation and cloud services in the Southern California market, Latisys has commissioned the first 22,000 square feet and 10 MW of power in its 93,000 square foot data center in Irvine, the company said today. The new facility is adjacent to Latisys’ existing 50,000 square foot data center (OC1), which has been serving business customers since 1994. “Latisys has committed significant capital and resources to the Orange County market by adding state-of-the-art infrastructure, investing in cloud technologies with high availability platforms, and building out a deep team of data center industry veterans,” said Tom Panarisi, Regional Vice President, Latisys. “Our flexible approach to delivering IT infrastructure services is driving strong growth for the firm and our position as the data center provider of choice for a diverse range of more than 300 Orange County and Los Angeles area businesses.”

Online Tech Expands in Michigan: Online Tech announced that it new data center in Ann Arbor, Michigan will open in October. The 20,000 square foot facility with 10,000 square feet of raised floor is located in Avis Farms, minutes away from Online Tech’s other Ann Arbor data center. “We have taken a long-term view toward the data center market and see this as an ideal time to bring additional capacity online,” said Brian Brizard, CFO of Online Tech. “With our first Ann Arbor data center filling up quickly, we want to make sure we have the capacity to meet our future growth plans. This new facility gives us enough headroom to continue our expansion plans.” Online Tech’s operations include data centers in both Ann Arbor and Flint Township. With the addition this new data center, Online Tech has grown to more than 40,000 square feet of data center space.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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