A Closer Look at Cloud.com

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Citrix announced earlier today that it will acquire Cloud.com. What exactly is Cloud.com and what does it do? Cloud.com offers an open source cloud platform used primarily by service providers (including Go Daddy) to quickly build and deploy cloud platforms, allowing them to offer in-house services to cloud-curious customers, rather than seeing them depart for Amazon. Last month we spoke with Cloud.com Chief Marketing Officer Peder Ulander, who provides an overview of the company’s technology and business in this video.

For more on emerging cloud technologies, see our Cloud Computing Channel. For additional videos, check out our DCK video archive and the Data Center Videos channel on YouTube.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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2 Comments

  1. The acquisition might be great news for Cloud.com, but there is a real danger of it slowing down the emergence of public cloud services and limiting the options of cloud customers. Despite the cloud explosion in the media, even today there are only 500 public cloud service providers in the world. Compared to the 33,000 hosting companies worldwide, it’s a very small percentage that can actually put public cloud services in the hands of customers. With Citrix and CA Technologies calling the shots over who makes it as a cloud service provider, we may start to see a squeeze on the speed of delivery of cloud services which will fall behind customer demand. Smaller hosting companies will actually be the biggest driver of public cloud provisioning, but they won’t necessarily meet the revenue or scale requirements of the newly consolidated big boys to get access to the software they need to start offering cloud services. Ultimately users will be forced to buy in a constrained market, which could trigger a rise in pricing, further delaying the advance of the public cloud.