Etsy Expands Infrastructure With Equinix

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Etsy, the online marketplace for handmade and vintage goods and supplies, has expanded into Equinix’s Silicon Valley SV5 International Business Exchange (IBX) data center, the companies said today. Etsy already houses equipment with Equinix in New Jersey and currently runs its off-site disaster recovery and storage infrastructure from Equinix’s Silicon Valley SV2 facility.

Equinix has been hosting Etsy in its data centers since 2008, supporting the growth of Etsy as it jumped from one million to more than nine million members, and from 250 million to more than 1 billion page views per month. Etsy’s e-commerce customers are highly sensitive to even slight delays in page loads, and the connectivity at Equinix has helped maximize revenue for sellers and return on investment in infrastructure for Etsy.

“Etsy was founded to help connect makers with buyers and we have a singular focus to support a positive buyer- seller experience through technology innovations,” said Mike Rembetsy, director of Technical Operations at Etsy. “By leveraging Platform Equinix, Etsy is not only able to optimize performance, but also leverage Equinix’s proximity to partners and suppliers to continue to scale the business to meet demand.”

“Equinix provides Etsy with the scalability and geographic diversity to meet the company’s rapid growth and performance requirements,” said Chris Sharp, general manager of content and digital media at Equinix. “We look forward to building upon this relationship in the future and helping Etsy provide buyers and sellers the best experience possible.”

Equinix (EQIX) provides colocation and interconnection services to more than 3,350 enterprises, cloud, digital content and financial companies and 650 network service providers. Equinix now operates 96 data centers in 37 strategic markets across the Americas, EMEA and Asia-Pacific.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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