Telx Expands its New Jersey Data Center

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The raised-floor area at the Telx data center in Clifton, NJ.

Citing steady demand for colocation and interconnection services, Telx said today that it is expanding its data center in northern New Jersey, and hinted at additional expansion plans in the region.

Telx will add 15,000 square feet of additional raised floor space to its footprint at 100 Delawanna Ave. in Clifton, N.J. This is the second expansion at the Clifton facility, which opened in 2009 and now houses a total of 50,000 square feet of space.

“We have been proactively adding square footage in New Jersey to give customers more room to grow and explore new opportunities,” said Eric Shepcaro, CEO of Telx. “We are also finalizing plans for an even larger expansion in the NY/NJ metro area due to customer demand. We believe that New Jersey is one of the prime markets for colocation space across several industries, particularly financial services, legal, cloud computing, pharmaceuticals, and large enterprise.”

The Clifton site connects to Telx’s carrier-neutral facilities at 60 Hudson and 111 Eighth Avenue, as well as a data center in Weehawken, providing Clifton customers with access to more than 400 networks in the New York metro region. The Clfton facility is about 11 miles from Manhattan.

Telx said the customer base at the Clifton facility includes a mix of financial institutions, media and content companies, service providers, cloud providers, pharmaceutical companies, legal, and Software as a Service (SaaS) providers.

In this video from 2009, Telx Director of Sales Engineering Kevin Strasheim provides an overview of the features of the Direct Edge nstallation at the Clifton data center, as well as space that will provide expansion for Telx and its customers. This video runs about 6 minutes.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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