Roundup: Telx, Quest, Digital Realty

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Here’s a roundup of some of this week’s headlines from the data center and hosting industry:

Telx Adds Data Center Space in Dallas – Interconnection and colocation provider Telx has expanded the data center footprint of its facility at 2323 Bryan St. in Dallas, Texas. The addition of a total of 20,000 square feet of conditioned/raised floor capacity for financial institutions, media and content companies, service providers, cloud providers and Software as a Service (SaaS) providers allows Telx to meet increasing demand for colocation and interconnection services in the Dallas area.

Quest Expands Data Center Space in Sacramento – Quest has completed the Phase 4 expansion of its Service Delivery Center (SDC) at the former McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento. Quest,a Sacramentoarea provider, has added 10,000 square feet of  operational space offering an all-new networking, electrical, and environmental conditioning infrastructure. The latest expansion will soon be followed by Phase 5 and Phase 6 expansions at the McClellan facility. The Phase 5 expansion will be completed by August, adding another 20,000 square feet of capacity dedicated to both SDC co-location and Quest’s Business Resumption Center (BRC). Phase 6, currently in planning, will bring Quest customers yet another 30,000 square feet of new space.

Appia Signs Master Lease With Digital Realty in St. Louis – Digital Realty Trust, Inc. (DLR) has signed a master datacenter lease agreement with Appia Communications for a combination of IT space and office space in Digital Realty Trust’s 210 N. Tucker property in downtown St. Louis. Appia plans to utilize this space to expand the colocation services it offers to customers. The space will also serve as the U.S. headquarters for Appia’s datacenter-related business.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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