Closer Look: The BendBroadband Vault

2 comments

The BendBroadband Vault is a 30,000 square foot data center in Bend, Oregon that has been designed with a focus on sustainability. The facility integrates a number of strategies to address its energy impact, including a solar array, the procurement of renewable power from the local utility, a cooling system that uses a “heat wheel” (Kyoto Cooling) system, and an efficient design that uses chimney containment to isolate hot and cold air within the data center environment. Here’s a closer look at the the Vault and its key features.

The data center is supported by a solar array that can generate up to 152 kW of power, about 18 percent of the total 900 kW capacity of the first phase of the facility.

The Vault uses white cabinets to house equipment, a design choice that can save energy, since the white surfaces reflect more light. This helps illuminate the serve room, allowing the Vault to use less intense lighting.

The facility uses two levels of containment, with a room that contains the cold air supply and a racktop chimney system to vent hot server exhaust air.

A look inside the power room at the BendBroadband Vault, which purchases renewable energy from its utility, PP&L, through its Blue Sky program.

The Vault installed a Kyoto Cooling system, which use a "heat wheel" in a fresh air cooling system employing an air-to-air heat exchange.an

BendBroadband has pursued LEED Gold and Energy Star Certification. The Vault currently has two anchor tenants, including St. Charles Health System, based in Bend. Five major network carriers provide broadband services to the facility, allowing tenants a choice of provider and supporting diverse paths of connectivity to the Vault. BendBroadband will also house key elements of its own Network Operating Center (NOC) at the facility, providing data and transport services to the region’s commercial and residential customers.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

Add Your Comments

  • (will not be published)

2 Comments

  1. Hank Erkel

    Thanks and look foreard to hearing from you in the future