Telx, CoreLink Forge Colocation Alliance

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Colocation providers Telx and CoreLink Data Centers have entered into a strategic alliance, the companies said today. The agreement provides growth opportunities for both providers, whose data center footprints have limited overlap.

Telx and CoreLink said the alliance will allow customers of both companies to seamlessly expand their colocation presence in key U.S. cities. The sales teams of Telx and CoreLink have completed comprehensive training on the other’s full suite of services in each location. Both companies operate a carrier-neutral facilities.

“Telx is actively looking to enhance our data center footprint around the world by teaming with best-of-breed partners like CoreLink,” said Eric Shepcaro, Chief Executive Officer of Telx. “By forging this strategic alliance, we can offer our customers the opportunity to enter new markets quickly and cost-effectively.

“Our alliance provides an expansion path for Telx customers into regions such as Seattle, Las Vegas and suburban Chicago, while CoreLink customers can tap into new business opportunities in New York City, New Jersey, Miami, Dallas, Charlotte, Atlanta and three separate locations in California,” said Mike Duckett, President and Chief Operating Officer of CoreLink Data Centers. “We see synergy in Telx’s approach to colocation, as we share a focus on providing connectivity-rich environments and adding value for customers by building carrier-dense ecosystems in each location.”

Telx is a privately held company headquartered in New York City with four facilities in the New York Metro area, two facilities in downtown Chicago, two facilities in Dallas, three facilities in California, (Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Santa Clara) and facilities in Atlanta, Miami, Phoenix and Charlotte. CoreLink operates five data centers in suburban Chicago, Las Vegas, Phoenix, and Seattle.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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