Top 5 Data Center Stories, Week of March 26

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An aerial view of the huge new i/o New Jersey data center, which previously served as a newspaper printing plant for The New York Times.

For your weekend reading, here’s a recap of five noteworthy stories that appeared on Data Center Knowledge this past week:

  • i/o Data Centers Readies Massive NJ Modular Site – i/o Data Centers is transforming a former New York Times printing plant in New Jersey into the world’s largest modular data center, the company said Wednesday. The 830,000 square foot building in Edison, N.J. will become the East Coast hub for Phoenix-based i/o Data Centers, which is converting the building into a facility to house data center capacity in customized containers.
  • Tech Titans Back OpenFlow Networking Standard – The world’s largest data center operators are joining forces to back an open networking standard, a move they say will accelerate innovation and make it easier to manage their far-flung networks. Google, Microsoft, Facebook and Yahoo have teamed with telecom giants Verizon and Deutsche Telekom to form the Open Networking Foundation (ONF), which will advance the development of a new open source networking protocol called OpenFlow.
  • Twitter Completes Data Center Migration – Twitter has completed a major data center migration and expansion. The infrastructure expansion will help the fast-growing microblogging service manage its dynamic growth, which has seen traffic scale to more than 140 million tweets each day.
  • Dell Targets Hosters With PowerEdge Microservers – Dell continues the steady flow of new products from its Data Center Solutions (DCS) unit, introducing two new microservers as part of its PowerEdge C5000 line. They’re designed for web hosting companies and ISPs seeking to improve the energy efficiency of their data center operations.
  • Big Data, and What It Means for the Data Center – Data is being generated at an incredible pace, and as improved analytics tools unlock value from it, processing and storing all that data becomes ever more important. “Big Data” has to reside somewhere, and that trend bodes well for data center demand.

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About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.