Mike Manos Takes Operations Post at AOL

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Industry veteran Mike Manos has joined AOL as Senior Vice President of Technology Operations, the company said this week. Manos’ shift to AOL follows leadership posts in data center operations at Nokia and Digital Realty Trust and Microsoft’s Global Foundation Services.

“Michael brings a wealth of valuable experience and expertise to the team,” said Alex Gounares, AOL Chief Technology Officer. “We are thrilled to have this highly sought after candidate on board as we continue to focus on developing best in class platform technologies that enable us to deliver excellent experiences to all of our users.”

“I am excited to join AOL, especially now as the company is refocusing on providing its users with the best possible experience online and that starts with building a world class technology team to support all of the great work begin done by AOL’s product teams,” said Manos. “Working with the global technology leadership team, I look forward to advancing the technological innovation across the AOL network.”

In a post on his Loose Bolts blog, Manos acknowledged that some in the data center industry might be puzzled by his move to AOL, a company not recently famed for infrastructure innovation.

“AOL is aggressively moving to redefine itself in the industry, to significantly transform and morph itself into a world that AOL itself helped create and define over 25 years ago,” he writes. “There is no arguing that the first true scale challenges in dealing with the Internet at large were experienced by those first AOL’ers as they had to deal with numbers of users never before seen in our industry. They pushed the boundaries of technology, they pushed the boundary of operations, they created whole new paradigms. To reinvent itself in a market with such competition, such diversity is a huge challenge.”

“I could have taken a safe bet. But where is the excitement? Where is the challenge?” Manos continued. “As the saying goes, ‘A ship is safe in the harbour, but that’s not what ships are for!’ This ship is setting sail and my commitment is that not only will we find a new world, we will define it!”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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6 Comments

  1. Jason

    Chris - interesting comments coming from an outsider! You ask anyone in the space about Mike and they will tell you he is one of the top 5 thought leaders in the space. Unless you know him personally and can speak to his body of work, which i doubt, i would keep your thoughts to yourself.

  2. Tran

    when a guy job-hops as much as manos does, there's a problem somewhere. my guess is it takes his employers about a year for them to figure out he's an empty suit.

  3. Bill

    As someone who worked with him at Nokia, I can tell you that his departure probably had more to do with a convoluted cloud strategy and a fractured technology adoption which has been the hallmark of this company for at least 5 years and lack of real leadership to deliver on something we really need to do. Manos was one of the few execs to tell it like it is. He also did not hide in Boston like the rest of management. . I wouldn't be so harsh especially looking at some of the statements by Elop the CEO about larger changes in direction and poor performance of the company as a whole.. Since they worked at Microsoft together my money is that he got the inside scoop on the changes ahead.

  4. Mark

    I love how uninformed people talk with such confidence without knowing any of the facts. I dont know the reason for his departure from Nokia, but his move from Digital was well known inside and outside. As someone who worked for him during his stay I can tell you he worked like a dog and was a huge loss to us. He had huge impact on everything from operations to design. The problem was the impact on his personal life, he was literally on the road all the time. I think he only made it home like a total of ten days. He has little kids and it was to much of an impact on his personal life. Everyone from Mike Foust on down was sad to see him go. He remains immensely respected internally. Crawl back in your holes, trolls.

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