NetApp Buys Akorri for Storage Capacity Tracking

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Software that manages IT infrastructure and tracks data center capacity is a hot niche, as illustrated by today’s announcement that storage specialist NetApp will acquire acquire privately-held Akorri Networks in an all-cash deal. Akorri is based in Littleton, Massachusetts and makes software to analyze and virtualize data center operations, with a focus on managing and tracking storage capacity.

NetApp (NTAP) says the Akorri deal will provide its customers with more tools to analyze fast-growing storage infastructures, boosting NetApp OnCommand with performance capacity analytics.

“The ability to accurately predict and manage performance and capacity requirements has been a common obstacle for many customers wanting to transition to a virtualized environment,” said Manish Goel, executive vice president, Product Operations for NetApp. “Akorri further strengthens NetApp’s data management capabilities to achieve greater quality of service and performance in their virtual and cloud environments. With these enhanced capabilities, customers can accelerate their transition to a shared IT infrastructure so that they can use IT as a tool to capitalize on new growth opportunities and spend fewer resources managing their environments.”

“Akorri and NetApp share a common vision of a dynamic IT infrastructure that is tightly integrated and highly efficient,” said Rich Corley,the founder and CTO of Akorri. “Akorri has emerged as a leader in performance management software by providing greater visibility and insight across the entire IT stack. Customers are thinking differently and choosing NetApp today as they transition to a shared IT infrastructure. The combination of our two companies will provide our customers the most comprehensive tools to plan for change and growth in their business.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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