Data Center Links for December 31st

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It’s time for 2010′sĀ  final review of noteworthy links for the data center industry. Here’s our linksĀ  for December 31st:

  • Minnesota town eager to boot up data center – The city of Eagan, Minnesota is willing to spend $2 million or more to back up its belief that the Twin Cities needs more “carrier hotel” facilities like the 511 building, which is also considered a high-security data center or “co-location” site. From the Minneapolis Star-Tribune.
  • Core Services NJ Data Center Now Operational – Oracle hosting provider Core Services announced on Wednesday its data center in Somerset, New Jersey is now live and fully operational. The company announced its move to the 50,000 square foot facility in February 2010. Formerly an alternative trading floor and disaster recovery center for a Wall Street bank, the Somerset Data Center (SDC) has a highly redundant infrastructure for power, cooling and security.
  • Pinboard.in Architecture – Pay to Play to Keep a System Small – Pinboard is a lean, mean, pay for bookmarking machine, a timely replacement for the nearly departed Delicious. And as a self professed anti-social bookmarking site, it emphasizes speed over socializing. When the demise of Delicious was announced, if Pinboard had been a free site they’d have been down immediately, but being a paid site helped flatten out their growth curve.
  • A Snapshot of Facebook in 2010 – Here is a snapshot of 20 minutes on Facebook showing the huge number of photos, links and statuses posted everyday demonstrating how much the internet has changed the way we interact with our friends.Did you know that 43 million Facebook users changed their status to “single” in 2010?
  • Zacks Upgrades Equinix to “Outperform” – From Data Center Stocks: “In the tradition of vague analyst-speak, Zacks recently announced it had upgraded Equinix from neutral to outperform. Its reasoning – the company beat consensus revenue by 0.4%, plus its ‘continuous efforts to expand the current facilities.’ Not sure how to interpret this. I mean, I’ve been to the Ashburn campus in the last few days and any effort – continuous or not – to expand DC2 will push them through the pine trees and into DFT’s ACC4 building.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.