Net2EZ Expands Into New Jersey Market

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Net2EZ Managed Data Centers has confirmed that it has  leased 2.275 megawatts of critical load in Dupont Fabros Technology’s NJ1 data center in Piscataway, New Jersey. Net2EZ is  a national provider of colocation and managed data center services, and the new facility will be its first data center in the New York/New Jersey market.

The lease was mentioned in DuPont Fabros’ recent earnings report, but the tenant was not identified at that time.  The company leases space in several of DFT’s Virginia data centers, and opted to take space in NJ1 in lieu of occupying additional space in the ACC5 data center in Ashburn.

DuPont Fabros just opened the first phase of its NJ1 data center in Piscataway, New Jersey. The building opened with three signed tenants, occupying about 20 percent of the available space. DuPont Fabros said the presence of a colocation and hosting company in the Piscataway facility will be helpful in accommodating tenants with smaller requirements of a few servers or racks.

“We have strengthened our relationship with Net2EZ as they have grown with us in three of our Northern Virginia data centers,” said said Hossein Fateh, President and Chief Executive Officer of DuPont Fabros Technology. “We are delighted that they have elected to expand into the New Jersey market with us. Moreover, Net2EZ’s platform allows smaller companies to capitalize on the level of dependability and efficiency that we have made available through our best in class data centers.”

“DuPont Fabros Technology has the flexibility and reliability we require,” saidPervez Delawalla, Chief Executive Officer of Net2EZ Their scalable model allows us to take additional space as our company and clients grow. We look forward to gaining access and operating in this new strategic market.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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