Telx, Interxion Partner on Financial Colo

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Telx and Interxion today announced a strategic alliance designed to help colocation customers easily locate expansion space on the other side of the Atlantic. The alliance is focused on customers in the financial services industry, where the growth of electronic trading is prompting many players to seek a global footprint for their high-speed trading operations.

Telx offers colocation and interconnection services out of 15 data centers in the United States, while Interxion offers similar services from its 28 data centers in Europe. The partnership with Telx addresses a market gap for Interxion, which previously had partnered with Switch and Data on colocation referrals. Switch and Data was acquired earlier this year by Equinix.

Telx and Interxion each host clusters of financial services companies in key financial centers including Chicago, New York, London, Frankfurt, Stockholm and Zurich.  The companies also see potential in offering trans-Atlantic services for cloud computing and content delivery.

“Telx’s U.S.-based, multinational clients have global requirements, and many require a single source solution,” said Eric Shepcaro, Chief Executive Officer, Telx. “By forging this strategic alliance with Interxion, we can extend our solutions to include international data center options and a broader services mix that helps both U.S. and European businesses enter new markets quickly and cost-effectively.”

“Our alliance with Telx will provide a smooth path for Telx customers into Europe’s leading consumer and business hubs and enable our European customers to tap into new business opportunities in the United States,” said David Ruberg, Chief Executive Officer, Interxion. “There is also a good strategic fit – Telx’s approach to colocation is similar to Interxion’s, with a focus on providing connectivity-rich environments and adding value for customers by building segment-specific communities of interest.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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