What to Read at DCK: Week of October 23

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For your weekend reading, here’s a recap some of the noteworthy stories that appeared on Data Center Knowledge this past week:

  • Google Resumes Work on Oklahoma Data Center – Google is resuming work on a major data center project in Pryor, Oklahoma, saying it will soon need to being additional data center capacity online. The $600 million Oklahoma project was originally scheduled for completion in 2009, but was delayed due to the slowing economy.
  • Inside Cisco’s New Texas Data Center – Cisco has launched Data Center 2011 Texas, an interactive tour of the new data center, which features the latest refinements to Cisco’s design.
  • Apps.gov to Begin Offering IaaS Cloud Services - Federal, state, local, and tribal governments will soon have access to cloud-based Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) offerings through the government’s Apps.gov cloud-based services storefront, the General Services Administration said Thursday.
  • Chill Off 2: Detailed Data on Cooling Choices – The Chill Off 2 final report – Evaluation of Rack-Mounted Computer Equipment Cooling Solutions – is a comprehensive resource for data center operators exploring the most efficient way to cool their servers. The project evaluated 11 cooling technologies from eight different vendors to determine which were the most efficient.
  • UK Carbon Plan Altered to Become ‘Green Tax’ - The UK’s Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC) is being “reformed” so that the Treasury keeps revenue raised through the carbon pricing scheme, rather than using revenues to offer rebates to companies that reduce their carbon output. The British government is citing a budget deficit as the driving factor in its decision to restructure the program.

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About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.