Telx Doubles Colo Space at 111 8th Avenue

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The exterior of 111 8th Avenue, where Telx is doubling its colocation footprint.

Colocation and interconnection provider Telx has nearly doubled the footprint of its data center at 111 8th Avenue in New York City, the company said today. The addition of 40,000 square feet of capacity allows Telx to expand its colocation and interconnection services at this key Manhattan connectivity hub.

This is the second data center expansion for Telx at 111 8th Avenue location in 2010, driven by strong demand from companies in the financial services industry seeking proximity-based colocation services. The new expansion space offers customers immediate access to fully-built raised-floor data center space supporting up to 200 watts per square foot of power density.

High-Value Financial Ecosystem
“The Telx 111 8th Avenue facility has become one of our key infrastructure growth locations in the New York metro area,” said Patrick Flannery, Director of Engineering for Sumo Capital, a Telx Financial Business Exchange customer. “Telx has built a high-value ecosystem for the financial services industry, and their expansion of the 111 8th Avenue facility will enable them to provide even more connectivity choice to their customers.”

The company bought the meet-me-room business of NYC Connect in 2007, and added 5,000 square feet in 2008, another 14,000 square feet in early 2009 and 21,500 square feet in March 2010.

“Once again, Telx has decided to add more data center capacity to our 111 8th Avenue facility in response to increased demand from our financial services customers, service providers and the broader enterprise,” said Eric Shepcaro, CEO of Telx. “By doubling our footprint in this destination location, we can immediately meet the power, latency, proximity, security and connectivity requirements of the most demanding financial services and enterprises and give them room for future growth.”

111 Eighth Avenue is among the world’s most wired buildings. It was originally built as the Port Authority Commerce Building in 1932, and was redeveloped for telecom use in the late 90s. The building was recently placed up for sale in an offering that is being closely watched as a barometer of the Manhattan real estate market.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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