SunGard Expands New Jersey Data Center

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SunGard Availability Services has expanded its New Jersey data center campus to meet growing customer demand for colocation and managed services. The SunGard campus in Carlstadt, N.J. supports the company’s New York City customers, including many financial services and healthcare firms.

SunGard Availability has added 12,000 square feet of raised floor in Carlstadt, with the capacity to add another 30,000 square feet as needed. The upgrade is also adding six megawatts of utility power with 2N redundancy (accessing power from separate utility substations) along with new UPS power systems. 

More than 660,000 Square Feet
“The expansion of our Carlstadt data center campus reflects SunGard’s continuous investment in people, technology and infrastructure to meet the demanding customer requirements of the New York Metro area,” said Patrick Doherty, chief marketing officer at SunGard Availability Services.  “With 660,000 square feet of available datacenter space and more than 2,000 workforce continuity seats on the Carlstadt campus, SunGard’s solutions help customers ensure the uptime of critical infrastructure.”

SunGard’s colocation and managed services allow customers to run business systems and applications at a SunGard facility rather than at their own data centers. The expanded Carlstadt datacenter supports SunGard recovery and hotsite services, offering workforce continuity seats which are fully equipped with the office resources, infrastructure and amenities to provide staff with an alternative workspace following an outage.

SunGard Availability Services provides disaster recovery services, managed IT services, information availability consulting services and business continuity management software to more than 10,000 customers in North America and Europe. The company operates more than 5 million square feet of data center and operations space.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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