Caulfield Named CEO at American Internet

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American Internet Services has announced the hiring of data center industry veteran Timothy Caulfield as chief executive officer. Caulfield has held senior executive positions with Savvis, Cable & Wireless America, Exodus and Digital Equipment. He succeeds Alessandra Lezama, who is leaving after three years of leading the company.

American Internet Services (AIS) is a data center and connectivity services company that operates seven data centers in Los Angeles, San Diego and Phoenix. The company is privately held, with backing from Seaport Capital, Viridian Investments, and DuPont Capital Management.

“Tim has an unparalleled track record as a senior executive who strengthens data center operations, focuses on customer services and support, expands technical capabilities, retains key employees and takes organizations to their next level of performance,” said Scott McCormack, partner at Seaport Capital and AIS Board member. “We are excited to have him join AIS. The Board of AIS would like to thank outgoing CEO, Alessandra Lezama, for her guidance and leadership over the past three years during which AIS built a solid foundation and expanded its data center footprint.”

As senior vice president of Global Operations at Savvis, Caulfield led the company’s efforts to expand its international data center footprint, upgrade its network infrastructure and expand its operational capabilities for managed services and utility computing.

“AIS, with its seven premium data center facilities in California and Arizona, has a solid reputation for offering unsurpassed security and award-winning redundancy for ensuring long-term business continuity,” said Caulfield. “I look forward to bringing my industry experience to AIS to build upon its market leading position by adding to the breadth and depth of services being offered.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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