Fundings for Nimbula, Viridity and VSS

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A number of companies in the data center and cloud computing sector have announced fundings this week. Here’s a roundup:

Nimbula Announces $15 Million Series B Round – Nimbula said this week that it has secured $15 million in its second round of venture capital funding led by Accel Partners. The new funding will be used to continue the company’s investment in innovation around hybrid cloud computing technologies and to drive market adoption of Nimbula’s product offering for the management of on- and off-premises infrastructure. Nimbula, which emerged from stealth mode in June 2010, was founded by former Amazon executives Chris Pinkham and Willem van Biljon, who led the development of the Amazon EC2 public cloud service.

VSS Monitoring Lands $20 Million – VSS Monitoring, Inc., the leader in distributed traffic capture, today announced it has secured its first institutional round of financing from Battery Ventures. VSS Monitoring’s Distributed Traffic Capture Systems are used by more than 1,000 enterprises, government agencies and service providers around the world. “Our business is experiencing tremendous momentum at a time when the network performance and operations management market is about to explode,” said Martin Breslin, VSS Monitoring founder and CEO.

Viridity Software Announces $8 Million Series B Round РViridity Software, the leading provider of data center energy resource management (ERM) solutions, today announced that it has raised an additional $8 million in Series B funding from current investors Battery Ventures and North Bridge Venture Partners. This follows-on a successful Series A funding round of $7 million. The additional funding will be used to expand the development of the company’s EnergyCenter software platform, as well as greatly accelerate its go-to-market activities.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.