Roundup: Telx, Equinix, Hurricane Electric

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Here’s our roundup of some of this week’s announcements of customers expanding their data center presence:

iland Expands Hybrid Cloud Services With Telx- iland, a leading provider of cloud computing infrastructure, has expanded the geographic reach of its infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) services through Telx’s network-neutral data center facilities in Atlanta, New York City and Dallas. “A key differentiator with Telx is their ability to bring us multiple connections with diverse providers, which enables us to uphold higher Service Level Agreements with our customers,” said Brian Ussher, President of iland.

Virtacore Taps Equinix Global Platform- Virtacore Systems, a leading provider of cloud solutions designed for the midmarket, has chosen Equinix, Inc. as the primary partner for Virtacore’s new infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS), delivered via Virtacore’s vCore platform. Virtacore will leverage Equinix’s global platform of data centers and services to deploy its new offering that will bridge public and private VMware Clouds. “Our past success with Equinix has made us very confident that Equinix is the right platform partner for what we believe is the industry’s best infrastructure-as-a-service offering,” said Tom Kiblin, CEO of Virtacore.

Hurricane Electric Establishes PoP at Phoenix NAP- Phoenix NAP, a next-generation datacenter and network access point, announced today that Hurricane Electric, a leading Internet backbone and colocation provider, has established a point-of-presence (PoP) within the Phoenix NAP facility. Hurricane Electric offers IPv4 and IPv6 transit solutions over the same connection, at speeds up to 10 Gbps or more. With its own global network, the company has 45 major exchange points with connectivity to more than 1,500 different networks.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.