Stream Data Centers Expands Into Denver

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Stream Data Centers has expanded into the Denver market with the acquisition of a new data center in Westminster, Colorado, the company said today. The facility was built in 2006 by a Fortune 500 insurance company. The 29,500 square foot single story building includes 10,000 square feet of existing raised floor and 7,500 square feet of disaster recovery office space.

Stream says it will market the data center for use by a single tenant. The fully operational data center is available for immediate occupancy.

“We are very excited about this acquisition and the opportunity to immediately enter the Denver data center market with an asset of this quality,” said Anthony Bolner, Senior Vice President of Stream Data Centers. “This is a secure, efficient single tenant data center facility unlike any other in the market. It is a tremendous opportunity for enterprise users needing to rapidly deploy critical data center operations, and have the ability to expand power density and cooling over time.”

The Stream Denver data center is designed for 1.125 megawatts of critical load. The mechanical system features water-cooled centrifugal chillers and plate heat exchangers that can provide “free cooling” using fresh air for approximately 60 percent of the year. The facility includes two diversely fed redundant fiber feeds and access to multiple fiber providers. Stream says the power and cooling infrastructure can be expanded for additional capacity.

Stream Realty has been an investor and developer of data centers for more than 10 years, and has bought, sold or developed more than 1 million square feet of data center space in Texas and California. Stream also leases or manages more than 45 million square feet of commercial buildings in Houston, Austin, Dallas, San Antonio, and Fort Worth.

Stream Data Centers has been in expansion mode this year, having added a 20,000 square foot data center in Richardson, Texas in addition to its existing facility in San Antonio.

The seller was represented by Mark Stables, David Horowitz, and Jim Kerrigan with Grubb & Ellis Company in Chicago. Stream Data Centers was represented in the transaction by Frank Kelley and Doug Bakke with CB Richard Ellis in Denver.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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