Digital Menus Drive Data Center Growth

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You know those digital signs that display menus for burgers and breakfast sandwiches at your local fast flood restaurant? There’s a data center supporting them.

Internet video specialist STRATACACHE said today that it has acquired a hardened data center facility in the Dayton, Ohio metro region. The company, which provides digital signage, says it will invest $3.25 million in the 10,000 square foot facility.

It will also provide expanded of services for several STRATACACHE customers that are among the world’s largest digital media networks. The company hosts more than 10,000 digital menu boards for the “quick service restaurant” industry. These digital menus support quick pricing changes, but also enable updates to comply with local laws on food labeling.

STRATACACHE says its new facility will be able to house up to 2,000 of its ActiVia servers that support digital signage.

“Within the last three years we’ve experienced heightened customer demand for managed digital media services as part of our digital signage/digital media practice,” said Chris Riegel, CEO of STRATACACHE. “This new facility will expand our ability to fulfill clients’ requirements for world-class services. Our customers are evolving from one to 10, and even 200, digital media devices per store and each device requires ongoing managed services to achieve their mission.”

The company didn’t identify the location of the “highly secure” facility within the Dayton marekt, but said the data center would provide redundant data paths, emergency backup power systems, and be controlled by an advanced facility access control system.

“This facility continues to show our dedication to the region and our further investment in building first-class technology and service operations within Dayton,” said Riegel. “Our business continues to grow by ‘outsourcing’ digital signage and digital media technology and system operations for customers from high-cost urban centers around the globe to the highly skilled, but lower cost, Midwestern United States.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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