Steadfast Networks Expands in NYC

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Chicago-based dedicated hosting provider Steadfast Networks announced a major expansion into the New York market with the acquisition of The New York NOC and the opening of its newest data center in Manhattan. The expansion is the latest signs of growth for Steadfast, which also recently bought virtual private server specialist VPSSpeed and opened a second data center in the Chicago market.

Steadfast is offering colocation and dedicated hosting services out of its carrier-neutral new facility at 121 Varick Street in New York, the company said today. Steadfast plans to consolidate existing facilities in North Bergen, N.J. and Commack, New York into the new facility.

“Manhattan is a major commercial and financial hub with a need for the highly available and scalable colocation hosting and dedicated server solutions we provide through the Steadfast Networks and The New York NOC brands,” says Karl Zimmerman, CEO of Steadfast Networks. “The combination of The New York NOC with Steadfast Networks makes the Manhattan data center ideal for businesses serving New York and the northeast region.  As a carrier-neutral New York colocation meeting place, our customers have easy access to dozens of other carriers and networks to carry out specific network strategies.”

Steadfast Networks was founded by Zimmerman in 1998 and has its primary data center in 10,000 square feet of space at the Lakeside Technology Center in Chicago. The company focuses on “transaction-intense” hosting for the financial, and gaming sectors, and just completed a second Chicago data center at 725 S. Wells Street.

The New York NOC was established in 2003 and located in Long Island, N.Y. and offers colocation, dedicated and VPS hosting services to hundreds of websites ranging from personal hobby sites to fortune 500 corporate companies.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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