Stream Plans Dallas-area Data Center

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The exterior of the new Stream Data Centers facility in Richardson, Texas.

Stream Data Centers has begun construction on a new 20,000 square foot data center in the Dallas suburb of Richardson, Texas, the company said today. The facility will yield 10,000 square feet of 36-inch raised floor space. The data center will be available for occupancy in August, and can be divided into four quadrants or controlled by a single tenant.

The Richardson Private Data Center will be built to support 175 watts per square foot of critical load, but designed for the expansion of power and cooling infrastructure to 230 watts per square foot of critical load. This flexibility allows companies to immediately deploy critical data center operations, and have the long term ability to expand power density and cooling.

“In the past couple of years, corporate capital for large scale data center buildings has tightened significantly,” said Anthony Bolner, Senior Vice President of Stream Data Centers. “We’ve now seen that enterprise users who were previously unwilling to entertain a multi-tenant data center are now becoming more comfortable with this concept – we’re in the early stages of a fundamental shift in the way Corporate America provisions its data center requirements, and that’s exciting.”

Stream Realty has been an investor and developer of data centers for more than 10 years, and has bought, sold or developed more than 1 million square feet of data center space in Texas and California. Stream also leases or manages more than 45 million square feet of commercial buildings in Houston, Austin, Dallas, San Antonio, and Fort Worth.

Stream selected Richardson because of its robust power and fiber infrastructure, the company said, citing the city’s status as home to data centers for companies including Texas Instruments, Cisco Systems, Bank of America, Capital One, AT&T, Verizon and Fujitsu.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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