Ousley Named New CEO at Savvis

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Managed hosting provider Savvis (SVVS) said Tuesday that board chair and interim CEO James E. Ousley has won the job, and will be the new chief executive officer. As a result, the company’s board of directors has ended its search for a new CEO. Ousley succeeds Phil Koen, who resigned Jan. 11.

“The experience that we’ve had with Jim serving as interim CEO over the past two months has led the board to conclude that we already have the ideal candidate in the chief executive role,” said Dr. James P. Pellow, chairman of the board’s corporate governance committee. “The same confidence in Jim that caused us to put him in the leadership position during the management transition has led us to ask him to take on the role on a regular, full-time basis, and we are very pleased that he has accepted. Jim has demonstrated a strong ability to work with the management team and has already exhibited the strategic vision and tactical sense required to effectively implement Savvis’ plans for the future and to aid in the company’s ability to grow and expand.”

“I’m excited about this new chapter in my career and pleased with the confidence the board of directors has shown in my ability to lead Savvis,” said Jim Ousley, chief executive officer. “As Savvis’ new CEO, I’m looking forward to building on our strong foundation and providing increased value to our customers, employees and shareholders.”

Ousley had served as non-executive chairman of Savvis since May 2006 and as a director since April 2002. In 2001, he was a founder of Vytek Wireless Corporation and was president, chief executive officer and a director until 2004. In addition, Ousley previously served as CEO and president of Syntegra Inc. and Control Data Systems.

Savvis also announced that it will expand its Savvis Symphony Open cloud infrastructure services to its Singapore data center later this month.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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