Gold/Platinum LEED Twinbill for Sabey

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A view of the Intergate.Columbia data center complex built by Sabey Corp. in Wenatchee, Washington.

A view of bey.comthe Intergate.Columbia data center complex built by Sabey Corp. in Wenatchee, Washington.

Sabey Corp. has obtained a Gold LEED certification for the shell and core for Building B of its Intergate.Columbia  complex in Wenatchee, Wash., while tenant VMware has received a Platinum LEED certification for the critical infrastructure for its data center in building B.

Platinum is the highest rating possible under the LEED ( Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) program for energy efficient buildings overseen by the US Green Building Council, while Gold is the second-highest rating. The VMware data center is one of just seven LEED Platinum data centers.

Building B at Intergate.Columbia is a 188,000 square foot facility supported by 22 megawatts of utility power. Sabey Construction was the general contractor for both VMware’s tenant improvements and for the core and shell.

In its announcement today, Sabey noted that the LEED standard was designed primarily for office buildings, and that data centers with LEED certification often have a high ratio of office to data center floor. VMware’s premises are comprised of just 15 percent office space, with 85 percent dedicated to data center operations.

Construction of the shell, core and critical infrastructure for Building B, from grading to commissioning, was completed in approximately 9 months.   

Sabey’s data centers are located in the Pacific northwest and designed to take full advantage of the area’s natural climate to capture energy savings. “The climate enables evaporative economizer cooling for most of the year,” said John Ford, Director of Technology Real Estate for Sabey. “That alone accounts for 50 to 70 percent energy savings.”

Sabey also incorporates hot aisle encapsulation into its designs to isolate hot and cold air within the facility, as well as an overhead cooling design that drives improved use of space by removing the raised floor.

Seattle-based Sabey recently said that it will expand its data center operations beyond the Pacific northwest through a partnership with National Real Estate Advisors.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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