Verari ‘Reboots’ With Focus on Partners

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Verari confirmed Tuesday that an investment group led by founder David Driggers has acquired the company’s assets and will ”re-start the Verari engine” with a focus on working through partners. In a statement on its web site, Verari announced the “successful acquisition of substantially all of Verari Systems’ corporate and intellectual property assets by an Investment Group led by Driggers.”

The high-performance computing company will change its name from Verari Systems to Verari Technologies. On Dec. 11 Verari halted most operations and laid off most of its staff, and its assets were placed for sale in an auction. Driggers’ group purchased all of Verari’s inventory, equipment and technologies and said it will support past Verari Systems’ customers.

Driggers said Verari Technologies will focus on blade-based servers and storage for high-performance computing, as well as data center containers.

‘Back to our Roots’
“We have the opportunity to go back to our roots of being a consulting company that heavily partners to deliver custom solutions for our customers,” says David Driggers. “The ‘new Verari’ is going to build stronger partnerships with our customers while delivering the solutions they require. I’m a strong believer that companies are more successful when they listen and collaborate with their customers.”

Verari’s intellectual property assets include the company’s patented Vertical Cooling Technology, BladeRack architecture and modular data center patents.

Focus on Licensing
“You’re going to see a concerted effort on our part to license and promote these unique technologies,” states Mr. Driggers. “With the ever increasing compute and storage issues our customers are facing today, I believe we are going to be well positioned to help them solve even the most demanding challenges.”

That includes Verari’s FOREST container offering, which has recorded some high-profile customers wins in recent months, including sales to Qualcomm and a deal with NASA to house its new Nebulacloud computing platform. Microsoft also uses a Verari container to power its Virtual Earth service.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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