Emerson Combines Avocent, Aperture

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Emerson Network Power (EMR) is combining its Aperture and new Avocent businesses as a new division focused on helping data center customers better manage their infrastructure, the company said today. The move consolidates two of the company’s recent acquisitions in the data center management sector. Emerson acquired Aperture in February 2008 and bought Avocent for $1.2 billion in a deal announced in October 2009.

The new division will be headquartered in Huntsville, Ala., and combines Avocent’s management systems division – which offers access and control of the physical aspects of network devices and servers – with Aperture’s capacity planning software. The new division will be led by President Stephen C. Hassell, who previously served as Emerson Vice President and Chief Information Officer (CIO) since 2004.

“It is appropriate that we are making this announcement in the first few business days of 2010, as we are ushering in a new era in data center management,” said Hassell. “The market is ripe for an infrastructure management solution capable of enhancing energy and operational efficiency while improving availability. I believe that our combined talents uniquely position us to deliver a one-of-a-kind solution to customers throughout the world.”

As CIO, Hassell was responsible for Emerson’s information technology strategy, including hardware, software, and services, as well as its telecommunications infrastructure. He has experience in data center design and management, as his team is in the midst of a global consolidation of Emerson’s more than 100 data centers worldwide and recently opened the company’s flagship data center in St. Louis.

Tom Waun, president of Aperture, will take on additional responsibility as president of global sales and marketing for the new division, and will join Avocent management team members who will retain their existing roles, Emerson said.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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