Fortune Gets LEED Gold in San Jose

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The Fortune Data Centers facility in San Jose, Calif. has earned LEED Gold status.

The Fortune Data Centers facility in San Jose, Calif. has earned LEED Gold status.

Fortune Data Centers has earned Gold certification for its San Jose, Calif. data center under the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) program for energy-efficient buildings. The facility is among a handful of LEED Gold data centers, and Fortune believes it is the first multi-tenant data center to receive Gold Certification for all of its usable tenant space.

“With data centers expending enormous amounts of energy to power and cool servers and IT infrastructure, we’re challenging the industry to move faster and reach further than before in designing, constructing and operating facilities in a more energy-efficient manner,” said Rick Fedrizzi, President, CEO & Founding Chair, U.S. Green Building Council, which operates the LEED program. “We commend Fortune Data Centers for being leaders in the data center industry by earning LEED Gold Certification and realizing the economic and environmental benefits of green building.”

Recycling Focus for Construction
Fortune’s facility has a Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) rating of 1.37 at full load, well below the industry average data center PUE of 2.0. Ninety six percent of construction waste was diverted from landfill, according to DPR Construction, meaning 1,137 tons of material were either recycled or re-used on site.

Fortune Data Centers’ energy efficiency features include a design that uses a slab floor and drops cool air into the data center from above, taking advantage of the natural tendency for denser cool air to fall while warm air rises.

Fortune also separated the hot and cold air with vinyl curtains between the top of the racks and the ceiling, preventing warm air from mixing back in with cool air for the servers. The facility employs water-side economization and highly-efficient cooling towers, as well as an advanced building management system to monitor and manage environmental conditions.

“We’re structuring our business so that customers can enjoy the benefits of LEED-certified data center space without paying a premium for it,” said John Sheputis, CEO of Fortune Data Centers. “We believe companies shouldn’t have to pay extra for energy efficiency, rather they should realize a reduction in costs. Fortune and our tenants are collaborating to maximize efficiencies, and our tenants receive 100 percent of the cost savings that result from saving energy.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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