Rackspace Adds Storage, DR Offerings

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In a reflection of the growing importance of large-scale storage and backup, Rackspace Hosting (RAX) today introduced new managed storage and disaster recovery services targeted for enterprise customers. The San Antonio managed hosting specialist said the new offerings are a response to customers wanting to increase their online storage.

“We evolve our enterprise offerings based on customer,” said Taylor Rhodes, GM of Enterprise Services for Rackspace. “They’re telling us they need a partner to provide important but non-strategic functions, and they want to buy them as services rather than pouring their own capital and IT resources into them. We are now able to offer our most complex customers solutions designed for their storage and data replication needs.”

Regulatory compliance, on-line transaction processing and rich media are just a few of the factors driving an exponential demand for enterprise-class storage and replication services, Rackspace said. The new services include:

  • dSAN: Highly scalable storage using Dell EMC CX4 Array technology.
    dNAS: A high capacity solution built on NetApp technology for media rich applications and large volume file level storage.
  • Host Based Replication:Data Center to data center replication designed to rapidly recover critical data in the event of a disaster. This offering is managed by a dedicated support team and includes a free DNS failover service.
  • Enterprise Replication Services:Data Center to Data Center replication and rapid failover for mission critical data stored using Rackspace dNAS services using NetApp NAS and SnapMirror technologies.
    Our Microsoft Exchange and SharePoint (Dedicated) solutions can allow customers to free up resources while improving the uptime and performance in their critical messaging and collaboration environments.

Rackspace (RAX) said it was also adding dedicated Microsoft Exchange 2007 and SharePointapplication hosting offerings.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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