The interior of CoreSite's Los Angeles data center. The company said today that it is expanding its footprint by 2 megawatts.

CoreSite Expands in Los Angeles

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The interior of CoreSite's Los Angeles data center. The company said today that it is expanding its footprint by 2 megawatts.

The interior of CoreSite's Los Angeles data center. The company said today that it is expanding its footprint by 2 megawatts.

Colocation and peering provider CoreSite continues to expand its data center footprint. Just a week after announcing an expansion in northern Virginia, the company says it is also planning a 2 megawatt expansion of its Los Angeles data center at 900 N. Alameda. The additional capacity is scheduled to be delivered in the first quarter of 2010.

The project will address growing enterprise demand for wholesale “move-in-ready” data center space in downtown Los Angeles, according to CoreSite, which says the new space could be delivered as either a private data center suite for a single enterprise customer, or partitioned to allow cage-to-cabinet colocation.

“We continue to see enterprises outsource their growing data center requirements,” commented David Dunn, senior vice president at CoreSite. “Our move-in-ready data center spaces can accommodate enterprises both big and small, and it allows customers the opportunity to license data center space exactly when they need it.”

The expansion space will feature high-efficiency UPS units, variable-speed fans for air conditioning units and branuch circuit montoring to minimize power bills and Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) ratings for the space.

“At CoreSite we are investing in data center design and construction processes that allow us to deliver more efficient data center space to our customers faster,” said Billie Haggard, CoreSite vice president of data centers. “Delivering new data center space capable of achieving lower P.U.E. levels is a CoreSite corporate initiative that will lower our customer’s overall cost of doing business as well as their carbon footprint.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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