John Savageau Departs CoreSite

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Data center and colocation service provider CoreSite announced today that Chief Technology Officer John Savageau has left the company to pursue oportunities in the cloud computing sector. Savageau joined CoreSite (then known as CRG West) in 2004 and led the company’s operations team and served as architect of CoreSite’s Any2 Internet exchange.

Savageau is leaving to “devote more time to thought leadership and the development of cloud computing initiatives,” CoreSite said in a statement. “CoreSite looks forward to opportunities to collaborate with Mr. Savageau in his private endeavors in these areas.” Savageau has written about his interest in cloud computing on his blog at Pacific-Tier Communications, a separate company Savageau founded in 2004.


“Each of us at CoreSite thanks John for his years of outstanding service and lasting contributions to the company,” said Thomas Ray, CoreSite President and CEO. “CoreSite and its customers are better for John’s time with our company and we wish him well in his future endeavors.”

Prior to joining CoreSite/, Savageau was CEO of MagicNet in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, where he led Internet infrastructure development and provided data solutions to the rapidly growing mining industry. As a pioneer in technology implementation, he has also held leadership positions at Pihana Pacific, Level 3 International, and Sprint International/Global One.

Dominic Tobin, CoreSite’s VP of Operations, will continue to oversee the operation of Any2 and the company’s distributed exchange, duties he assumed in February of 2009. CoreSite emphasized that it will continue to invest in the technological development and geographic expansion of Any2. CoreSite will continue to develop its Cloud Innovation Center for Excellence (CICE) and explore opportunities to provide a utility for cloud computing companies in CoreSite data centers.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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