From the Moon to the Cloud

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The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, shown here in an illustration by a NASA artist, will take lunar images that will be backed up by the Nirvanix cloud storage platform.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, shown here in an illustration by a NASA artist, will take lunar images that will be backed up by the Nirvanix cloud storage platform.

High-definition images of the moon shot by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) satellite are being backed up on the the Nirvanix Storage Delivery Network, a cloud storage solution developed by Nirvanix.

The LRO, which launched last week, will spend a year orbiting the moon and collecting detailed information about the lunar environment. Images from the satellite’s camera will be transmitted from the satellite to a project team at Arizona State University for processing, copied to a separate storage unit at ASU and then replicated to the Nirvanix Storage Delivery Network. ASU and NASA have already transferred multiple TBs of original Apollo mission imagery to the Nirvanix CloudNAS-based solution.

“While this project may be one small step for NASA’s program to extend human presence in the solar system, it definitely represents a giant leap in cloud storage’s ability to provide a reliable, scalable and accessible alternative to tape for long-term retention of enterprise-class data,” said Jim Zierick, President and CEO of Nirvanix.

“The tertiary copy of images from the LRO Camera stored on the Nirvanix CloudNAS is online and accessible within seconds and the project managers at ASU do not need to worry about managing offsite storage, allowing them to focus on the more important mission at hand, ” Zierick added.

Nirvanix says its CloudNAS software can turn any server on their network into a gateway to the cloud, providing access to unlimited storage via the Nirvanix Storage Delivery Network.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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