Conferences: Uptime, DCD in DC, Tier 1

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April will be a busy month for data center industry conferences. Here’s a few of the highlights:

  • The Uptime Institute’s four-day Symposium 2009 runs next Monday through Thursday (April 13-16) at the Hilton New York. Day passes are available. In a late addition, Google’s Chris Malone will be on hand to discuss the company’s data center innovation and energy efficiency. “Google is using industry-proven concepts in radically different ways, which has led to millions of dollars in savings for the company,” said Kenneth G. Brill, executive director of the Uptime Institute. “By making appropriate business tradeoffs that optimize reliability, performance, and capital and operational expenditures, the Institute estimates that Google has saved at least $500 million in capital expenditures alone. The point here is that any company with a similar business case, application portfolio and appetite for risk can accomplish equally striking results.” Malone will present on Tuesday at noon. NOTE: I’ll be participating in a panel Tuesday at 3:30 pm on “Sustainable Computing in the News.” If you’re at the conference, stop by to say hello.
  • DataCenterDynamics Washington DC is scheduled for April 21 at the Renaissance Hotel, and will focus on government policy and energy efficiency. Sessions will address the new Energy Star server space, the DOE’s drive toward “net-zero” energy use in government buildings, and   the Department of Defense’s Enhanced Use Lease program.
  • Tier 1 Research will hold its Datacenter Transformation Summit on April 28 at the Hyatt Dulles in Herndon, Virginia.  The event will feature panels on data center real estate, whether to build or buy,  new approaches to data center architecture, and cloud computing.  

Be sure to watch DataCenterConferences.com for our updated list of industry events.   

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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