Wolverine Trading Expands With CRG West

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Low-latency trading specialist Wolverine Trading will expand its New York operations in new space at the CRG West data center at 32 Avenue of the Americas, the companies said today. In addition to proprietary trading, Wolverine also offers technology solutions to other financial trading operations. The Chicago company said CRG West’s New York data center provides it with one of the lowest latency offerings available.

“The importance of low-latency access has increased along with the level of available technology,” said Jeremy Krinn, a member of the Market Data Group at Wolverine Trading. “The pursuit of a latency advantage is equivalent to an arms race. We now measure throughput in nanoseconds. Wolverine knows well the importance of a solid infrastructure and we consider CRG West’s properties to be consistently among the best.”

“The addition of Wolverine Trading speaks volumes to the type of data center offering here at CRG West in New York,” said Joseph Kiaer, CRG West Vice President at 32americas. “For all of our financial customers, we provide the security, access to financial networks and reliable power that they need to run their businesses.”

The CRG West site at 32 Avenue of the Americas is a 50,000 square foot facility that was once a cafeteria but was transformed into data center space last year.

Wolverine is also an equity investor and anchor tenant of 360 Technology Center Solutions, a new disaster recovery and colocation facility in the Chicago of Lombard, Ill. Wolverine has branch offices in New York, San Francisco, and London. 

CRG West provides wholesale data center and retail colocation space in 11 carrier-neutral data centers in Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Northern Virginia, the San Francisco Bay Area, and Washington D.C.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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