DuPont Fabros Reports New Leases

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Rackspace Hosting has leased space in this DuPont Fabros Technology data center facility in Virginia.

The DuPont Fabros Technology ACC4 data center facility in Virginia.

Data center landlord DuPont Fabros Technology (DFT) continues to report strong leasing activity at the company’s data center facilities. The company announced three new leases this morning, including two leases with Fortune 500 enterprise companies for all the remaining space in its flagship ACC4 data center in Ashburn, Virginia. The leases totaled 2.275 megawatts of critical power load.

The leases continue a flurry of leasing activity in northern Virginia, as users with large footprint requirements look to lock up space. ACC4 was completed in the fourth quarter of 2007, and has a total power capacity of 36.4 megawatts of critical load.

DuPont Fabros also announced that it has a new tenant at its CH1 facility in metropolitan Chicago, which has leased space equivalent to 1.3 megawatts of critical load. The new tenant is an enterprise company with an S&P credit rating of A/A-1. Phase I of the facility is now 17 percent leased.

The leasing activity continues a strong start to 2009 for DuPont Fabros, which halted construction on its data center projects late last year due to the credit crunch, but has been boosted by new leases in both Chicago and Virginia. 

“We are pleased that our prototype ACC4 asset is 100 percent leased and that CH1 continues to gain traction,” said Hossein Fateh, President and Chief Executive Officer of DuPont Fabros Technology. “With the execution of these three leases, totaling 3.575 MW of critical load, we not only are diversifying our tenant base but building valuable relationships with high caliber businesses, which should position us well for future growth.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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