Managed Data Becomes Latisys

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latisys-logoManaged Data Holdings has changed its name to Latisys, consolidating three regional managed hosting and colocation operations into a single national brand. The company’s  recent acquisitions – Intelenet in the Los Angeles market, Data 393 in Denver, and Stargate in Chicago – will be folded into Latisys, with a new web site serving customers from all three markets.

“We’re taking the logical next step in the evolution of our company,” said Peter Stevenson, Chief Executive Officer and co-founder of Latisys. “We are an emerging national services provider designed to meet customer needs for colocation and IT management solutions. And our strategically located data centers in different geographical regions let us provide cost-effective disaster recovery solutions.”

The name Latisys (pronounced LAT-eh-sis) combines the words “latitude” and “information systems,” which the company says reflects its national reach and breadth of services.

“Demands placed on IT organizations and businesses for cost-effective outsourced data center solutions, information storage, security and scalability are significant,” said Stevenson. “Latisys offers scalable infrastructure management solutions that provide customers with exactly what they need, when they need it.”

The company was founded as Managed Data Holdings in June 2007 by Catalyst Investors and Great Hill Partners. It has moved quickly to build a footprint in the managed hosting sector, acquiring three providers and quickly expanding their data center capacity. Here’s a recap:

  • October 2007: MDH buys managed hosting Intelenet in Irivine, Calif and adds 12,000 square feet of new space.
  • January 2008: MDH acquires Denver colocation and managed hosting company Data393 and accelerates a planned 10,000 square foot expansion. 
  • August 2008: Managed Data buys Stargate in the Chicago market and starts a 13,000 square foot expansion.  

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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