The Sentilla Energy Manager deploys energy sensors in rack-level power strips.

Sentilla Debuts Wireless Energy Manager

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The Sentilla Energy Manager deploys energy sensors in rack-level power strips.

The Sentilla Energy Manager deploys energy sensors in rack-level power strips.

Just weeks after raising a $7.5 million financing round, Sentilla Corp.has launched its Energy Manager, a system using a wireless sensor network to provide a detailed analysis of a data center’s power use. Sentilla’s technology embeds tiny microprocessors in power strips that can measure energy consumption at the server level and then transmit data back to a central management server.

Wireless monitoring is valuable in data centers because it allows company to retrofit existing data centers to measure temperature and humidity. Sentilla focuses on providing granular data about server-level power usage. The data can be tracked and managed through a web-based dashboard. 

“It really gives you a holistic view of everything happening in the data center from an energy perspective,” said Joe Polastre, the co-founder and Chief Technology Office of Sentilla. “The goal is to make it as easy as possible to get good energy data.” 

Sentilla said its Energy Manager is being used by one unnamed large data center client. Sun Microsystems (JAVA) will also be installing the Sentilla system in its executive briefing center at its Santa Clara headquarters.     

“Sentilla’s solution hones in on the central issues of energy efficiency and sustainability – our demand for efficient, intelligent use of available energy,” said Subodh Bapat, vice president of the Eco Responsibility Office at Sun Microsystems. “The Sentilla Energy Manager provides companies the ability to reduce their energy usage and reduce their carbon footprint, resulting in a more robust bottom line.”

product overview (PDF) is available on the Sentilla web site. Energy Manager is sold through a software license, with pricing starting at $250 a port, Polastre said, with lower rates for volume purchases.  

Sentilla was founded in 2003 and known as Moteiv prior to a rebranding in 2007. This month’s $7.5 million Series B funding was provided by ONSET Ventures and Claremont Creek Ventures, which previously provided $6 million Series A funding in 2006.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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