Roundup: IBM, Frost Bank, Northgate, TRES

This week's roundup of data center real estate news feature items about IBM (IBM), Frost Barnk, Northgate Technoklogies and Telecom Real Estate Services (TRES).

It's been a really busy news week, and there's more to come. There have been a flurry of announcements of new data center projects and expansions. Here's a roundup:

  • In addition to the new disaster recovery data centers it announced yesterday, IBM may also upgrade an existing facility in the Hudson Valley. "We have discussed the potential expansion of an existing customer data center at our Poughkeepsie site, but this is a separate project," IBM spokesman Jeff Couture told local media.
  • Frost Bank has confirmed the details of its $50 million data center in the Westover Hills section of San Antonio. The 70,000 square foot facility will cover approximately 10 acres of a 25-acre plot that Frost owns in the area. Bank officials say the land has been cleared for development and the site is being prepared for construction, with a completion date of the fourth quarter of 2009.

  • Axill Europe, a subsidiary of Northgate Technologies, has acquired Reuters' London data center for an undisclosed sum. The acquisition of the 8,000 square foot data center will help Northgate meet the expansion needs of a waiting list for clients requiring additional space and power. There is a major shortage of space and power to meet data centre demand with no new data centers being built in central London because of power diversion to the Olympic site and London Cross Rail.
  • Telecom Real Estate Services has bought a 69,626 square foot data center in the Sacramento suburb of Rancho Cordova. the new data center is a free-standing secure building with 40,000 square feet of 24-inch raised floor and approximately 27,000 square feet available for servers operating at over 100 watts per square foot.
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