Stream Realty Starts San Antonio Data Center

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Stream Realty Partners has started construction on a “ready-to-fit” data center building on a 33-acre site in the Westover Hills office park in San Antonio, which has developed into a major data center hub. The Dallas real estate development company says the 150,000 square foot, structurally enhanced data center building will be offered as a “powered shell” opportunity for single-tenant enterprise users.

The facility will have eight-inch thick concrete walls and a 24-inch thick concrete roof system designed to withstand 175 mph winds, and can be expanded to 350,000 square feet while maintaining a 200-foot setback. Stream says the data center will have two 10 megawatt utility feeds, each expandable to 30 megawatts each. The primary feed will come from the recently announced 200 megawatt Westover Hills substation located immediately adjacent to the site, with the second feed available from a 200 megawatt substation located 1.5 miles from the site. Power in San Antonio is available at approximately 5 cents per kilowatt hour, the company said.


The Stream Realty site is adjacent to where Microsoft is building a $500 million data center to support its Office Live services. Microsoft’s commitment was announced in January, 2007 and has been followed by the announcements of multiple data center projects in Westover Hills, which will soon be home to mission-critical facilities for Lowe’s, Christus Health Systems, Valero Energy, Frost Bank and Power Loft.

Stream Realty describes the Westover Hills data center as “LEED directed” with access to gray (recycled) water and multiple fiber optic providers. The project is scheduled for completion in February 2009.

Stream Realty has been an investor and developer of data centers for more than 10 years, and has bought, sold or developed more than 1 million square feet of data center space in Texas and California. Stream also leases or manages more than 45 million square feet of commercial buildings in Houston, Austin, Dallas, San Antonio, and Fort Worth.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.

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