Major Data Center Expansion for Colo4Dallas

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Colocation specialist Colo4Dallas has bought two buildings and leased space in a third site to continue the expansion of its data center footprint. The expansion is yet another sign of the strong demand for colocation and dedicated hosting in the Dallas data center market, where major providers have been steadily adding data center space for the past two years.

Colo4Dallas confirmed today that it has purchased its current facility at 3000 Irving Boulevard, along with an adjacent property at 3004 Irving Boulevard that will be used for expansion space. In May Colo4Dallas leased 40,000 square feet of data center space in a nearby Level 3 data center in Dallas.

With the expansions, Colo4Dallas has increased its total data center space from 28,000 square feet to 106,000 square feet. The company has filled about 90 percent of the space in its original site at 3000 Irving, which it has occupied since 2000.


“I think it is also important to note that as we reach 100% capacity of 3000 Irving Blvd we are only at 50% capacity of power,” Colo4Dallas President Paul VanMeter writes on his blog. “This is in contrast to the many facilities that have plenty of space without power to fill the cabinets. While this may seem like we overbuilt, I believe that the current customers will need additional power over time in their current cabinets. This has been the trend over the last 5 years and I see no reason for it to change.”

VanMeter told the Dallas Business Journal that Colo4Dallas expects to spend about $8 million to equip 3004 Irving with raised floors, high-density power capacity and environmental and security controls.

Data center or colocation providers who have expanded in Dallas in recent months include Telx, Savvis (SVVS), CyrusOne, SoftLayer, The Planet and Dataside.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.