CRG West Adopts Usage-Based Power Pricing

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CRG West is implementing usage-based power pricing at its new data centers in Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Northern Virginia and the San Francisco Bay Area. The power pricing model, based on actual utilization, will benefit colocation customers by offering savings to those who reduce their IT electrical loads.

With the installation of Branch Circuit Monitoring (BCM) technology at seven of its 10 data centers, CRG West can provide usage-based pricing for AC power to even single-cabinet colocation customers. In addition, the BCM technology improves upon CRG West’s ability to manage and monitor power consumption at the data center, enabling customers to pay only for the power they consume and providing the visibility into load management that helps customers increase their uptime.

CRG West previously charged a flat monthly fee per circuit for breakered power capacity, which meant that customers would often pay for capacity they aren’t using. Under the new model, customers can reduce their bills by turning off hardware that isn’t in use during off-hours or by purchasing hardware that is more efficient. Coming soon, CRG West will also offer customers the ability to monitor their power draws by circuit.


“CRG West believes our usage-based monitoring methodology and pricing platform better aligns the data center provider and the customer,” said David Dunn, Senior Vice President of CRG West. “Many colocation providers invoice power based on total capacity and customers fail to see any benefit from a temporary or permanent reduction in power consumption. CRG West customers, on the other hand, can see an immediate impact from a permanent or temporary reduction in power consumption. Customers can now reduce costs by going green and immediately realize the operating savings stemming from their capital decisions.”

CRG West now operates more than 2 million square feet of carrier hotel and data center space in nine facilities in Los Angeles, San Jose, Chicago, Boston, Miami, northern Virginia and New York. The company has been steadily increasing its national footprint of data center and carrier hotel properties over the last two years, as well as building its meet-me-room and interconnection business.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.