Telx Expands Colo Space at 60 Hudson Street

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Telx has acquired an additional 5,300 square feet of space on the 9th floor of 60 Hudson Street, one of the leading carrier hotels in New York City. The expansion will create space for an additional 220 cabinet equivalents, and enhances the company’s position in the New York City market for colocation and interconnection services. Telx also operates the main meet-me room facility at 111 8th Avenue, the other major carrier hotel in New York

Telx has expanded its colocation space within 60 Hudson Street, its historic base of operations for its interconnection business. In 2006, the company added an additional 13,000 square feet of space on the ninth floor, and in 2007 added 10,000 square feet on the 11th floor of the building.

“After a strong first Quarter, this expansion space is necessary to satisfy the growing demand of our customers and prospects requiring interconnection options to fulfill their technology needs,” said Tesh Durvasula, Chief Marketing and Business Officer of Telx. “Our sales and marketing teams are doing a phenomenal job promoting our value to the enterprise market. After a year of national expansion and customer growth, we are continuing to see strong demand in our core markets.”


“Our sales funnel is filled with a host of new customer applications such as 7ticks Consulting and MediaXstream, as well as continued expansion opportunities from our existing customer base,” added Bill Kolman, Executive Vice President of Sales for Telx. “This addition will not only help us meet these immediate requirements, but will certainly solidify our position in the market as the leading interconnection provider.”

Telx now operates 14 sites in nine markets, serving more than 500 customers. While its colocation service has grown in recent years, Telx sees colo primarily as a means to an end, leasing most of its space to interconnection customers, who tend to have a different profile than hosting providers or enterprise data centers. Telx has facilities in New York, Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Santa Clara, Miami, Phoenix, Charlotte, and Weehawken, NJ.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.