GDCM Targets US With nLyte Express

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Global Data Center Management (GDCM) is taking the “global” piece of its name seriously. After building a client base of some of the world’s largest enterprise customers from its home base in Great Britain, GDCM is expanding into the U.S. market for data center management software. The London-based firm has opened offices in California, New York and Dallas, and says it is finding strong interest in its nLyte suite.

“This is really the year to get the word out,” said Daniel Tautges, President, USA of GDCM. “I tell people we’re the best software no one knows about.”

In the U.S., anyway. But Tautges hopes to change that. GDCM’s booth at the recent Data Center World in Las Vegas was busy throughout the show as attendees watched demos of nLyte’s capabilities. As data center professionals deal with growth and complexity in their facilities, there’s strong interest in data center management tools, Tautges said.


“Once you get to 100 racks, the pressure builds,” he said. “They’re having a revelation. In the past, if the data center was mismanaged, it wasn’t such a big deal, because it was black magic. Typically, Joe in the data center was our guru and would take care of it for you, and here’s how long it would take. There was no real pain threshold if Joe couldn’t get it done in time. Now that data center operations is being put before senior-level people, it’s a bigger deal. They’ll buy it if it reduces cost.”

nLyte allows data center staff to manage critical infrastructure, automating operations and capacity management. The software provides change and configuration modeling, workflow and process automation, and tracking of power, cooling, cabling and network connections.
Although the software is running in many enterprise data centers, GDCM is also targeting mid-market companies in the U.S. with nLyte Express, which includes capacity management tools but not the workflow and process management modules.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.