Quality Tech Expands with Miami Data Center

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Managed hosting provider Quality Technology Services continues to expand, and has opened a new data center in Miami, Florida, the company said today. The 37,000 square foot facility has been engineered to withstand a category five hurricane, and adds to QualityTech’s existing footprint of more than 2 million square feet of data center space across the country.

“It has been our goal to provide a premier solution in the Florida market for our current customers and for new customers,” said Chad Williams, CEO of Quality Technology Services. “QualityTech is dedicated to Miami and we are committed to providing customers with a premium level of service and our outstanding mix of enterprise-driven products.”

The new Miami data center includes 10,000 square feet of customer-ready space with 1,350K watts of UPS capacity. The first phase of construction will open for customer installation in July. When it is completed, the Miami site will offer 20,000 square feet of raised data center floor, and 4,050K watts of UPS capacity.


QualityTech, which is privately held, us part of the Quality Group in Overland Park, Kansas, a suburb of Kansas City. In 2003 the company started acquiring data centers in the Kansas City area and Wichita, Kansas, and Indianapolis, Indiana. In 2006 QualityTech purchased the customers of Globix, along with use of a facility in Santa Clara, California.

Its largest presence is in the Atlanta market, where it operates a 376,000 square foot data center in Suwannee and bought a 960,000 square foot building from MetroNexus.

In late 2006 the company bought NTT USA LLC in a deal that included a 130,000 square foot data center in Jersey City, New Jersey. In December it purchased the customers of First National Technology Solutions (FNTS) in the Kansas City market and acquired the Santa Clara data center it had been using since the Globix deal.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.