Telx Powers Low Latency Trading for 7Ticks

Add Your Comments

7Ticks, which provides managed hosting for financial trading, has expanded its infrastructure into Telx’s New York facility located at 111 8th Avenue. The expansion provides 7Ticks with low latency connectivity to its operations at the 350 East Cermak carrier hotel in Chicago, which has the quickest access available to the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) matching engines that execute electronic bid and ask transactions for the exchange.

7Ticks is based in Chicago and designs low latency trading solutions for financial transactions, including managed high-speed access to the CME and other leading international exchanges. The company also provides direct access to the Intercontinental Exchange (ICE), a global commodity and financial products marketplace, including the world’s leading electronic energy markets and soft-commodity exchange.


“Telx has made our expansion into the New York market seamless,” said Adam Florzak, Business Development Manager at 7ticks. “With increasingly limited space and power in Chicago, and the growing demand among trading firms requiring ultra-low latency access to the CME and ICE, our expansion requirements – which included access to multiple, diverse network providers offering low-latency on-net access to our core network – were fully realized at Telx’s 111 8th Avenue facility. These premier services help satisfy our need for speed, because in this business, time is money and milliseconds matter.”

Telx also has a presence in the Chicago market with Meet Me Room facilities located at both 350 E. Cermak and 600 South Federal in Chicago. The next phase of 7ticks’ global expansion will be a direct, network-neutral connection from their New York POP to a proximity POP located at the Eurex Exchange presence in Frankfurt, Germany.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.