SWsoft Acquires WebHost Automation

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SWsoft has acquired WebHost Automation Ltd., the UK-based company that makes the Helm control panel and billing software for Windows. SWsoft, which will soon be rebranded as Parallels, is already a major player in the hosting automation market with its Plesk, Confixx, HSP Complete and PEM products. In September it acquired Ensim’s hosting automation business and the Positive Software division of Comodo, which makes the H-Sphere control panel.

SWsoft said the deal provides it with a significant worldwide customer base of 1.5 million end users, including strong positions in the U.K. and South America. Financial details of the transaction were not disclosed. Both companies are privately held.

“By integrating Helm into the SWsoft family of automation and virtualization solutions and partners through our Open Fusion initiative, Helm customers will be able to take advantage of a wider array of solutions and new business opportunities such as software as a service (SaaS),” said Serguei Beloussov, CEO of SWsoft.


“The increasing demand for Windows-based solutions in the hosting industry is providing a tremendous growth opportunity for application and tool vendors,” said John Zanni, managing director of Worldwide Hosting for Microsoft Corp. “Integrating Helm into its portfolio gives SWsoft the means to reach a wider audience and provider a fuller, richer experience to its customers.”

SWsoft will maintain existing Helm development resources and continue to support Helm solutions through SWsoft’s 24×7 support centers for the time being, but will eventually “incorporate the best features of Helm with existing SWsoft products.”

SWsoft is a private company that has received funding from Bessemer Venture Partners, Insight Venture Partners and Intel Capital. The company’s software powers more than 130,000 servers and 600,000 desktops worldwide.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.