Microsoft Confirms Dublin Data Center Plans

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Microsoft has confirmed its plans for a major data center in Dublin, Ireland, which we first reported about back in May. Microsoft confirmed that it will spend $500 million on the data center, which will span 51,000 square meters – or about 550,000 square feet, slightly larger than the company’s first two data centers in its Live platform buildout in Quincy, Wash. and San Antonio. Real estate industry sources say Microsoft is also planning a huge data center in Northlake, Illinois.

The facility will be built at the Grange Castle Business Park in southwest suburban Dublin, near existing plants for Wyeth and Takeda Chemical Industries Ltd. of Japan. In July month the company paid about $15.7 million to purchase 19 acres of land owned by the South Dublin County Council. The facility will be a two-story building with an office component, according to site plans filed for the Dublin facility.

“This is the first mega data centre deployment outside the US specifically targeted for the growth and performance of Windows Live services,” said John Mangelaars, vice president, Microsoft EMEA Online Services Group.


Dublin is one of the hottest data center markets in Europe. Digital Realty Trust (DLR) has announced a 120,000 square foot greenfield data center project in Dublin, and already owns two existing facilities spanning 140,000 square feet that are fully leased.

Microsoft already employs more than 1,200 people at three campuses in Ireland, its major European base. Microsoft Ireland’s managing director, Joe Macri, told the AP the data center would employ an additional 15 to 20 people, reflecting the high level of automation involved, while subcontracts would employ five to six times as many people. He said construction would employ 800.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.