Major Qwest Contract with i/o Data Centers

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Qwest Communications (Q) has announced a multimillion-dollar agreement with i/o Data Centers to create a custom telecommunications solution for i/o Data Centers’ Scottsdale ONE facility. i/o said it chose Qwest because it provides an “exceptionally robust solution” for large bandwidth needs and could work within the company’s design specifications. Scottsdale ONE is the first facility for i/o Data Centers, which plans to build a national data center network.

“This agreement shows how Qwest is willing to go above and beyond for customers such as i/o Data Centers who have mega bandwidth needs,” said Chris Ancell, vice president of sales, Qwest Business Markets group. “Qwest now provides high-capacity network services for many of the top Fortune 500 companies in the nation. And now, other businesses in Arizona can take advantage of the mega bandwidth available in the i/o Data Center.”


“Our Scottsdale ONE data center facility is perfect for enterprises of all sizes but is particularly ideal for companies looking to outsource high-performance application hosting and primary or redundant data center operations, and who need N+1 and 2(N+1) data center service level specifications,” said Anthony Wanger, senior managing director of i/o Data Centers.

Scottsdale ONE can provide customers with Internet speeds from 1 Gigabit per second (Gbps) to 10 Gbps. i/o Data Centers is using a GigE port from the Qwest 40 Gbps backbone. Qwest and i/o Data Centers have designed the 100,000 square foot Scottsdale facility for future scalability of 40 Gbps and 100 Gbps interfaces.

i/o Data Centers is the data center operations affiliate of private equity firm IO Capital, LLC with $100 million in assets. i/o’s management team developed and operated the Downtown Phoenix Technology Exchange before selling it to Digital Realty Trust in a 2006 transaction valued at $175 million.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.