Data Center Migration Firm Acquired

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As more companies consolidate data centers or build new ones, tools and expertise in data center migration are becoming more valuable. That trend is a driver in a deal announced Tuesday in which London-based Data Center Moves International (DCMI) was acquired by GlassHouse Technologies, an IT services firm in from Massachusetts. The deal expands GlassHouse’s data center services and includes DCMI’s proprietary software for managing the data center migration process.

DCMI software ties applications to physical devices, allowing clients to see which devices are using power and other resources. The tool can also be used to measure and shrink a data center’s carbon footprint.

“DCMI has a unique service offering that fits neatly within our overall Transom approach to IT infrastructure,” said Mark Shirman, president and CEO of GlassHouse Technologies. “Similar to our services for storage, backup and server virtualization, the data center services help transform IT infrastructure from technology-centric to service-centric environments. Clients gain a more efficient data center with lower energy costs and reduced maintenance
fees.”


The press release from GlassHouse included testimonials from two of DCMI’s high-profile customers. “DCMI’s services have been key to our data center projects,” said James Dunlop, a major account sales executive at Unisys. “Projects have been seamless and they provide measurable ROI.” Steve O’Donnell, the global head of data centers for British Telecom, has worked with both GlassHouse and DCMI. “We see this acquisition as a benefit to BT,” said O’Donnell. “GlassHouse will provide broader delivery support to DCMI’s unique capabilities. We have great confidence in the high level of service and accountability they provide.”

DCMI staff will be integrated into GlassHouse’s existing organization under the Data Center Services practice. GlassHouse says its consulting business is “transforming IT environments to a service provider model.” Clients include Morgan Stanley, State Street Global Advisors, Reed Elsevier, Amgen, T-Mobile Virgin Atlantic, and the Israeli Defense Forces.

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor-in-chief of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.