Telx Network Powers WV Expansion

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When New York interconnection specialist Telx was acquired by GI Partners late last year, chief strategy office Hunter Newby said the deal would “position Telx at the vanguard of change in the network interconnection space.” Within days, Telx announced a deal to manage meet-me-rooms in 10 major Internet gateways owned by Digital Realty Trust (DLR), the large technology REIT that spun off from GI Partners. In March Telx acquired the meet-me-room at 111 Eighth Avenue, which along with Telx’ home base at 60 Hudson Street gave the company network hubs in New York’s two largest carrier hotels.

The series of deals created a network of connectivity hubs in major U.S. Internet markets, allowing Telx to offer a “one-stop shopping” option for companies seeking to rapidly deploy a national network across 12 markets. The benefits of this growth could be seen in this week’s announcement that Nashville-based WV Fiber has used its colocation sites in Telx facilities to expand its network reach and access to connectivity and customers.

WV Fiber is a spinoff of Nashville-based telecom equipment vendor Wilhagan Ventures, which bought assets from Enron’s bankruptcy to build a national fiber backbone. WV Fiber has POPs in Telx facilities in Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York and San Jose, providing it access to 500 Telx customers.


WV Fiber also has operations in data centers run by Level 3 (LVLT), Equinix (EQIX), Switch and Data (SDXC) and Telehouse, but cited the breadth of the Telx infrastructure as an advantage in its latest network upgrades. “We are pleased to colocate with Telx wherever possible,” said Peter Marcum, Chief Executive Officer of WV Fiber. “Telx provides us with the most diverse range of options for buying and selling our network connectivity and services.”

“We are thrilled that our Core Interconnection business model can be a springboard for WV Fiber’s success,” said Newby. “By upgrading their network and extending their services to the greater telx community, not only is a validation of what we do, but a win for other customers requiring diverse and reliable IP connectivity, content creation and management services from within our facilities.”

About the Author

Rich Miller is the founder and editor at large of Data Center Knowledge, and has been reporting on the data center sector since 2000. He has tracked the growing impact of high-density computing on the power and cooling of data centers, and the resulting push for improved energy efficiency in these facilities.